Posts Tagged With: doubt

John 20: Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Back in college, I studied the Gospel of John with Jim Woodroof, an fantastic speaker and an even better man.  In that course, we read a book he had written about the Fourth Gospel called Between the Rock and A Hard Place.  The basic premise of the book, as I recall, was that Jesus is consistently portrayed in John as one who places people “between a rock and a hard place” so as produce a decision of faith in their life.  Jesus desired to bring people to rock solid faith in him but first they had to have reason to believe.

As was discussed in the introduction to John, one of John’s greatest goals with his book was to help people come to believe in Jesus.  This is the “gospel of belief,” as our other textbook called John.  We see a statement of this goal at the end of our chapter today, in what for many is the purpose statement of this gospel:

Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which aren’t written in this book.  But these are written so that you may believe that the Messiah, the son of God is none other than Jesus; and that, with this faith, you may have life in his name. (20:30-31)

Belief, though, is easily squashed by doubt and alternate explanation.  As long as one can explain the deeds of Jesus in some other way, faith can be deferred.

My professor’s point was that over and over again we see Jesus doing things that could only be explained by him being divine.  He can tell the Samaritan woman details about her love-life.  He can heal a man born blind.  Jesus walks up and paralysis is gone.  Thousands of people eat a full meal from five loaves and two fish.  This was the “hard place.”  There people stood between the hard place of trying to explain away the inexplicable or the rock solid faith that can come through a belief in Jesus.  Either Jesus is divine as he says or there is some naturalistic explanation for what has just happened, but what that could be?  Could it be that Jesus is God is the easiest explanation?

I see this dynamic happening three times in John 20.

  1. It all comes to a head for the “other disciple” — who most people think is John — when he runs into the empty tomb and sees the grave cloths all neatly folded up.  This can’t be explained away, and it made everything else make sense for him (20:8-9)
  2. Mary sees a man she thinks is the gardener, a stranger to her. But when he can call her by name, she realizes Jesus was more than just a man. (20:16)
  3. Thomas can’t believe that Jesus could be back from the dead.  That is until he puts his fingers in Jesus’ wounds and can’t deny the facts. (20:25-28)

The best ending to this post would be these words of Jesus from today’s reading:

Is it because you’ve seen me that you believe?  God’s blessing on people who don’t see, and yet believe. (20:29)

What did you see today?

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John 11: Thomas the “Twin”

“Apostle St. Thomas” by El Greco

Other than being listed in a few lists of apostles, all that we know about the apostle Thomas comes from the Gospel of John.  Thomas is a far more complex character than some of us may have realized.  Thomas has forever been known as the “doubter,” but today we see something very different about him.

We know him as Thomas, but he was also known as Didymus, likely a Greek name.  Interestingly, Didymus means “twin.”  Maybe Thomas the apostle was a literal twin.  That would explain the name.  But as we read through John we will see, in three places, that Thomas truly is a twin within himself.

Today we see the apostles’ fear to return to anywhere in Judea (11:8).  The Judaeans want to kill Jesus.  Why would he give them another chance?  When Jesus explains that Jesus is going to use the death of Lazarus to grow their faith, Thomas is the first apostle to respond:

“Let’s go too,” he said. “We may as well die with him.” (11:16b)

This is one side of the “twin.”  The side who boldly launches off into peril.  The one who is willing to risk life and limb.  This may not be a Thomas we have always thought of.

On Thursday we will see Jesus proclaim that he is headed to his father’s house to prepare a place for them, but that he would be back to get them, though they know the way anyway.  Thomas is quick to correct Jesus:

Actually, Master, we don’t know where you’re going, so how can we know the way? (14:5)

Notice though who it is that is most interested in knowing the way so as to follow Jesus.  Thomas, once again.  This man is gung-ho to follow.

“The Incredulity of Saint Thomas” by Caravaggio

Last, and most famously, it is days after Jesus’ resurrection.  He has appeared to the apostles but Thomas was not there.  When Thomas is told what he has missed, he is incredulous.

“Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands,” replied Thomas, “and put my finger into the nail-marks, and put my hand into his side — I’m not going to believe!” (20:25b)

This is the other side of Thomas the Twin.  He needs proof before he budges an inch.  I’ll believe it when I see it.  Is this doubt?  Maybe so.  Both an incredible faith regardless of cost and cautious doubt concerned with being duped are bound up in Didymus.  He is both.

If we are honest with each other and ourselves, we are both too.  There are days we launch out with immense faith sure all will be fine or that it won’t matter if it is not.  Other days we hold back and need proof to take another step.  We are Didymus too.

I love the last quote from the Bible attributed to Thomas.  This is how he ends.  Maybe he is ready rumble.  Maybe he needs to investigate Jesus like a doctor.  Regardless, Thomas ends with this statement.  May we as well.

“My Lord,” replied Thomas, “and my God!” (20:28)

What did you see anew today? 

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Matthew 4: The Kingdom Arrives

In the last chapter, we saw John preach about a kingdom that was coming.  Now with Jesus’ arrival that message changes slightly:

“Repent!” he would say.  “The kingdom of heaven is arriving.” (4:17)

Matthew then summarizes the message Jesus preached in the synagogues of Galilee as “the good news of the kingdom” (4:23).

We are still trying to determine what exactly this “kingdom” is but one thing we can know for sure is that Jesus is central to it.  As Jesus comes, so too does the kingdom.  Maybe at this point we can tentatively say that the kingdom is what one experiences when Jesus comes into one’s life.

"Follow Me, Satan (Temptation of Jesus Christ)" by Ilya Repin

I have always thought the way Satan decides to phrase his temptations is interesting, given what had just happened at the end of Matthew 3.  There we saw God’s Spirit alight on Jesus and a voice (presumably God’s) say,

This is my son, my beloved one,” said the voice.  “I am delighted with him.” (3:17)

Many others have noted that these three sentiments are three of the most basic affirmations a human needs to hear and be sure of in his life:

  • This is my son” — I claim you.  You are mine.  You belong to me, and I am glad to make that known.
  • My beloved one” — I love you.  I have deep affection and concern for you.  My emotions about you are positive.
  • I am delighted with him” — I am proud of you.  I approve of you.  I see what you do and it makes me happy.

It is interesting to me that Satan decides to attack Jesus at this most basic level: “If you really are God’s son . . .” (4:3, 6).  It is as if Satan is saying, “I know what you just heard, but are you sure?”  Maybe you need to test this.  Let’s put this to a test.  Make some bread.  Take a jump.

How often are our doubts and failures attached at a deep, even unconscious level to an uncertainty of divine acceptance, love and belonging?

Jesus’ path to victory is also instructive.  In the midst of this attack intended to produce doubt, Jesus hangs on to God’s words.  For Jesus the answer to the doubt and accusations of Satan was found in what God had already said.

We can learn from Jesus’ commitment to Scripture.

What grabbed your eye in this chapter?

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