Posts Tagged With: angel

Revelation 10: Sweet but Sour

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“The Angel of the Revelation” by William Blake

Back in the sequence of the seven seals we came to an interlude between the sixth seal and the seventh that spoke encouragingly of the sealed 144,000 and the numberless masses.  Today we come to another interlude at the same point in this new sequence of seven trumpets.  This break in the action of judgment is also intended to be a message to the Christians directly, but this time about their responsibility as witnesses.

A giant angel holds a small, opened scroll in his hand.  John is told to take this scroll and eat it, and he does.  Then John is told the prophecies of punishment on the evil of the world will continue.  A logical conclusion is that this scroll contains the visions of Revelation 10 and 11, revelations that must be given to the Christians directly before we can return to the seventh trumpet at the end of chapter 11.

The detail that caught my attention is that the scroll tastes sweet but then it turns the stomach sour.

“Take it,” he [the voice from heaven] said to me, “and eat it.  It will be bitter in your stomach, but sweet as honey in your mouth.”  So I took the little scroll from the angel’s hand, and I ate it.  It tasted like sweet honey in my mouth, but when I had eaten it my stomach felt bitter. (10:9-10)

That God will see the faithful through these horrible days of judgment is sweet indeed.  They can rest assured of the protection their seal affords.  Yet, the message of chapter 11 will remind them that they must first suffer.  They are not saved from death, they are victorious through death.  The immediate, emotional realization of this fact will turn their stomach.

We are again reminded that while Revelation is definitely a book of hope and good news, it does not promise a pain-free, comfortable ride through the choppy waters of persecution.  One has to take up his cross before receiving a crown.  

When have you experienced the bittersweet nature of divine revelation before?

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Luke 2: A Sign of Things to Come

It is a little surreal reading this classic Christmas chapter on June 28 when it is above 90 degrees F in Memphis!

I was drawn to this passage today as I read:

“Don’t be afraid,” the angel said to them [the shepherds]. “Look: I’ve got good news for you, news which will make everybody very happy. Today a savior has been born for you–the Messiah, the Lord!–in David’s town. This will be a sign for you: you’ll find the baby wrapped up, and lying in a feeding-trough.” (2:10-12).

The sign the angel is talking about, no doubt, was that Jesus was to be found swaddled and in a manger.  That would have been the clear sign the shepherds could use to find Jesus.  What other newborn in Bethlehem would have been found in a cattle trough?

But I am wondering if there is more meaning to this passage than the literal.  This is a very unorthodox place for the Messiah to be laid.  This is not how a king should be born and laid to receive his admirers.  And these are strange people to pick to tell first about the birth; shepherds were second class citizens or less.

Is that maybe part of the sign?  Is this a sign of what kind of king this would be?  An indication of what sort of ministry this savior will have and to whom he will minister primarily?  A hint that he will be a much meeker, socially marginalized savior than expected, one better suited for shepherds and innkeepers?  That would certainly fit what we know about Luke’s concern for the disenfranchised of his society.  But it might still fit today, don’t you think?

Who are the people in your world who can better identify with a savior in a feeding-trough than a bassinet? 

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Matthew 28: Terror and Great Delight

The women scurried off quickly away from the tomb, in a mixture of terror and great delight. (28:8)

This is an angel standing before us — a majestic messenger of God that strikes fear in all who see it.

The message is that Jesus has been raised from the dead — the message we long to hear, though it defies logic.

We are running off to tell the disciples Jesus has been resurrected — they will be so excited, if they don’t think we are out of our minds.

That appears to be Jesus up ahead — Hallelujah, but can I trust my eyes?

Rumors are swirling that the resurrection is a hoax we cooked up by stealing the body — that is not the truth, but it is easier to believe and the Jews are buying it.

We have hurried off to Galilee to meet Jesus — how can we help but worship, but wait a minute “Is this real?”

He is sending us out in the world, the hostile world, the one that killed him — he is with us with all authority in heaven and earth, but will they kill us like they killed him?

Faith is not easy.  It defies pure logic.  It makes you second guess what you are seeing.  It doesn’t add up.  There are always alternative theories afoot for what you are choosing to believe.  That can be terrifying.  But if it is true, if it is true . . . there will be great delight!

What does resurrection mean to you?

Categories: Matthew | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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